Music was expanding in all directions in the 1960’s; one of my favorite genres is the psychedelic/garage rock from that era.  Few songs capture the sound & the spirit of that style as “I Had Too Much To Dream (Last Night)” by The Electric Prunes.  Take a trip with me back to those halcyon days with one of the flagship songs from the psychedelic period.  

“I Had Too Much To Dream” (Annette Tucker & Nancie Mantz) Copyright 1966 4-Star Music; copyright 2004 Acuff Rose Music Limited

— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. Give ’em a listen! And remember to follow this show, so you never miss an episode. 

In our previous episode, we looked at the history of instrumental songs that topped the pop charts. For my money, there’s never been a more unlikely hit instrumental than the synth-infused, riff-heavy stomper that is Edgar Winter’s “Frankenstein”. This episode, we break down this instrumental classic featuring Edgar Winter on keyboards, sax and drums.

“Frankenstein” (Edgar Winter) Copyright 1972 EMI Longitude Music

— This show is part of the Pantheon podcast network — THE place for music junkies, geeks, nerds, diehards and fans!

Nothing came easy for Badfinger. Though they had success with their first few albums (all of them are must-have classics), they soon had a tough time, thanks to terrible management, record label indifference and bad timing. In 1974, worn-down & exhausted from the non-stop touring/recording/touring again grind, they dragged themselves into the studio… and, with help from producer Chris Thomas, made one of their best albums. Many fans say it IS their best. Unfortunately, few people heard it as it was withdrawn from stores shortly after its release, thanks to legal shenanigans. Things only got worse after that. But this record is a masterpiece; let’s celebrate it with a look at the song “In the Meantime/Some Other Time”.

“In the Meantime/Some Other Time” (Mike Gibbins, Joey Molland) Copyright 1974 WB Music Group ASCAP

If you liked this episode on Badfinger, then check out our previous show on “Day After Day”:
https://lovethatsongpodcast.com/badfinger-day-after-day/

— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. Give ’em a listen! And remember to follow this show, so you never miss an episode.

After 50 years locked away in a vault, the world finally got to see and hear some of the abandoned footage from the Beatles “Let It Be” sessions. The new documentary “Get Back” gives us almost 8 hours of never-before seen film and an unprecedented look at The Beatles at work. It was worth the wait. On this Special Edition of the podcast, we’re joined by 3 of the biggest Beatle fans I know– Ken Mills, Craig Smith and Brian Jacobs— to discuss this fascinating look at the most important band in rock history.

— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. You should check them out! And remember to follow this show, so you never miss an episode

When Frank Marino announced his retirement in 2021 due to a medical condition, his fans were shocked. “Tales Of The Unexpected”, indeed. So let’s take a few minutes to appreciate this great guitar player with a look at one of his funkiest tracks.

“Sister Change” (Frank Marino) Copyright 1979 Daksel Music Corp BMI

— This show is just one of many great Rock Podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Get ’em while they’re red hot!

We’re back with another “Albums That Made Us” episode; this time my guest is author Christy Alexander Hallberg, whose new novel Searching For Jimmy Page is a must-read for any Led Zeppelin fan. On this episode, Christy shares how discovering “Led Zeppelin IV” was a life-changing moment, how the music has brought comfort over the years, and inspired her book. We also discuss one of my first album purchases, Queen’s “Day At The Races”.

Buy the book here: https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/

— This show is one of many podcasts on the Pantheon podcast network — THE place for music junkies to get your fix. Check ’em out!

1971 was a banner year for great rock albums, and one of the best of the best that year was “Sticky Fingers” by The Rolling Stones. On this episode, we take a dive into a key track from that album, “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking”, where the Stones begin with a killer Keef riff and end up 7 minutes later in a completely different place. How did they get there? Let’s take the journey with them… and along the way, we’ll pay our respects to the late, great Charlie Watts.

“Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” (Mick Jagger & Keith Richards) Copyright 1971 ABKCO Music, Inc. All rights reserved.

— This is one of the many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcast network, the please to be for music-obsessed listeners like you & me!

The Who released a string of classic albums, but many consider Quadrophenia to be their best. It’s certainly one of their most ambitious. Pete Townshend wrote the songs, but the stunning performances by Roger Daltrey (vocals), Keith Moon (drums) & John Entwistle (bass) bring the songs to life. Nowhere is that more evident on “The Real Me”, which features all four members in top form, showing why they were one of the all-time great bands.

The Who – “The Real Me” (Peter Townshend) Copyright 1973 Fabulous Music Ltd, Towser Tunes Inc and ABKCO Music Inc

— This show is one of many podcasts on the Pantheon podcast network — THE place for music junkies to get your fix. Check ’em out!

Let’s give some overdue respect to a band of 4 great players who knew how to rock. Here’s a guitar-driven update on an old blues classic, from one of the best live albums of the ’70’s. As a bonus, we take a side trip to explore the origins of a familiar guitar riff.

“Honey Hush” (Lou Willie Turner) Copyright 1963 Unichappell Music Inc

— This show is one of the many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Collect ’em all!

What’s the difference between a “riff” and a “lick”? Between “reverb” and “slapback echo”? We try not to get too technical on this podcast, but occasionally some listeners will get stumped by some of the terminology. So for our 75th episode, I thought I’d explain some of the terms we use on this show– and why it’s necessary to have this “language” to begin with. (Because there’s no sheet music notation for “fuzz tone”.)


— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. You should check them out! And remember to follow this show, so you never miss an episode.