George Harrison emerged from the rubble of The Beatles breakup with all cylinders firing. After years of working in John & Paul’s shadow, George had amassed a stockpile of great songs. It all burst out in 1970 on his triple-album set, All Things Must Pass. One of the standout tracks was “Beware Of Darkness”, a warning to everyone (including himself) to be wary of corrupting influences. Featuring an all-star band, wall-of-sound production, and the introduction of George’s slide guitar playing, which would define his sound for the rest of his career. Let’s listen to the song many consider George’s masterpiece.

“Beware Of Darkness” (George Harrison) Copyright 1970 Harrisongs Ltd

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It’s another episode of our “Albums That Made Us” series, where we explore how music has made a big impact on our lives. We’ll be joined by a guest to discuss an album that shaped their lives in some way.

On this edition, we’re joined by Chris Porter, who’s had a long career in the music business as a concert producer, even programmer, talent buyer, and booking manager. And he’s also an old friend. So join us for a discussion on “Aftermath” by The Rolling Stones and The Who’s “Who’s Next”.

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Let’s give some overdue respect to a band of 4 great players who knew how to rock. Here’s a guitar-driven update on an old blues classic, from one of the best live albums of the ’70’s. As a bonus, we take a side trip to explore the origins of a familiar guitar riff.

“Honey Hush” (Lou Willie Turner) Copyright 1963 Unichappell Music Inc

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Sometimes, when times are tough and it seems like the world’s against you, a song like this can keep you going. A stunning mix of jangling guitars, sparkling harmony vocals, and a heart-wrenching lead vocal by Alex Chilton, this is my favorite song from my favorite album by the band often referred to as “the greatest band you’ve never heard”.

“The Ballad Of El Goodo” (Alex Chilton & Chris Bell) Copyright 1972 Ardent/Koala Music Inc/Birdees Music Corp./Irving Music Inc USA

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I’ll happily go out on a limb and say Deep Purple was THE hard rock band of the ’70’s. They could shift from monster guitar riffs to complex classical-influenced passages to outright improvised jams– all within one song. Built around a trio of top-of-their-game players (guitar, organ & drums), with a series of distinctive, powerful singers & bassists — the lineup changes so iconic they became known as Deep Purple Mark I, Mark II, Mark III, etc. This episode, we’ll break down the classic Mark III track, “Burn”, and listen to all the ingredients in this witch’s brew.

“Burn” (Ritchie Blackmore, David Coverdale, Jon Lord and Ian Paice) Copyright 1974 Purple (USA) Music

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Some songs call for you to speak out & demand action. Some songs explore the deepest depths of your soul. Some songs are timeless expressions of love. This song… it just kicks ass. Humble Pie was a guitar riff machine, and Steve Marriott was 5′ 5″ of vocal dynamite. Add a trio of the finest backing singers– Venetta Fields, Clydie King and Sherlie Matthews– and you’ve got a party.

“Thunderbox” (Clemson/Marriott) Copyright 1974 Almo Music Corp/Rule One Music (ASCAP)

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It’s been 40 years since the death of John Lennon, a senseless loss that still stings. Here’s one of my personal favorite Lennon tracks. We’ll follow it from its early stages through to the final album version.

“Nobody Loves You (When You’re Down And Out)” (John Lennon) Copyright 1974 Lenono Music (BMI) All rights controlled and administered by EMI Blackwood Music Inc

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Rare Earth’s sound was equal parts funky soul and straight-up rock. For decades, when there’s cause for celebration, folks have been crankin’ up this chunk of funk rock. Let’s take a closer look at how Rare Earth carved their place in history with this track.

“I Just Want To Celebrate” (Nick Zesses, Dino Fekaris) Copyright 1971 Jobette Music Co., Inc (BMI)

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Some bands take time to develop a unique sound, but Queen sounded like Queen right from the beginning. “Keep Yourself Alive” was the opening track on their first album, and it contains all the requisite Queen elements: the heavy riffs & orchestrated guitars, the vocal harmonies, dramatic musical shifts and Freddie’s powerful voice. The band would go on to scale bigger heights, but the magic was there from the start. Let’s have a listen.

“Keep Yourself Alive” (Brian May) Copyright 1972 Queen Music Ltd

— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. You should check them out! And remember to subscribe to this show, so you never miss an episode.