What’s the difference between a “riff” and a “lick”? Between “reverb” and “slapback echo”? We try not to get too technical on this podcast, but occasionally some listeners will get stumped by some of the terminology. So for our 75th episode, I thought I’d explain some of the terms we use on this show– and why it’s necessary to have this “language” to begin with. (Because there’s no sheet music notation for “fuzz tone”.)

— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. You should check them out! And remember to subscribe to this show, so you never miss an episode.

Every once in a while you hear a song by a band you’ve never heard of and it knocks you out. This was one of those songs for me. A band from Ireland came out of nowhere (as far as the USA is concerned), got some radio play with a great song, and then is largely forgotten here. Same ol’ story. Should’a been a big hit, if ya ask me. But what do I know? Listen to this track along with me and see if you love it as much as I do.

“Hello Hello Hello Hello Hello (Petrol)” (Written by Something Happens) Copyright 1990 Virgin Music, Inc. (ASCAP)

– This show is one of many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Check ’em all out!

Sometimes, when times are tough and it seems like the world’s against you, a song like this can keep you going. A stunning mix of jangling guitars, sparkling harmony vocals, and a heart-wrenching lead vocal by Alex Chilton, this is my favorite song from my favorite album by the band often referred to as “the greatest band you’ve never heard”.

“The Ballad Of El Goodo” (Alex Chilton & Chris Bell) Copyright 1972 Ardent/Koala Music Inc/Birdees Music Corp./Irving Music Inc USA

— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon podcast network. Check ’em out!

I’ll happily go out on a limb and say Deep Purple was THE hard rock band of the ’70’s. They could shift from monster guitar riffs to complex classical-influenced passages to outright improvised jams– all within one song. Built around a trio of top-of-their-game players (guitar, organ & drums), with a series of distinctive, powerful singers & bassists — the lineup changes so iconic they became known as Deep Purple Mark I, Mark II, Mark III, etc. This episode, we’ll break down the classic Mark III track, “Burn”, and listen to all the ingredients in this witch’s brew.

“Burn” (Ritchie Blackmore, David Coverdale, Jon Lord and Ian Paice) Copyright 1974 Purple (USA) Music

— This show is one of the many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Check ’em all out!

Merry Clayton never had a big hit, but her voice can be heard in dozens of songs you know (we’ve listened to one of them here before– see episode #42). One of the legendary background singers profiled in the documentary 20 Feet From Stardom, most of her solo work is largely unknown– which is a shame, because there’s some great music on those albums. Take this example from her first album, Gimme Shelter. Merry takes this James Taylor classic to a whole new place, one of my favorite cover songs of all time.

“Country Road” (James Taylor) Copyright 1970 Blackwood Music Inc./Country Road Music Inc. (BMI)

— This show is just one of many great podcasts on the Pantheon network–THE home for music podcasts!

Some songs call for you to speak out & demand action. Some songs explore the deepest depths of your soul. Some songs are timeless expressions of love. This song… it just kicks ass. Humble Pie was a guitar riff machine, and Steve Marriott was 5′ 5″ of vocal dynamite. Add a trio of the finest backing singers– Venetta Fields, Clydie King and Sherlie Matthews– and you’ve got a party.

“Thunderbox” (Clemson/Marriott) Copyright 1974 Almo Music Corp/Rule One Music (ASCAP)

— This show is part of the Pantheon network of music-related podcasts, check out all the other great shows! And please subscribe to this show — that way, you’ll never miss an episode, they’ll be delivered right to you.

It’s been 40 years since the death of John Lennon, a senseless loss that still stings. Here’s one of my personal favorite Lennon tracks. We’ll follow it from its early stages through to the final album version.

“Nobody Loves You (When You’re Down And Out)” (John Lennon) Copyright 1974 Lenono Music (BMI) All rights controlled and administered by EMI Blackwood Music Inc

— This show is one of many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network, all available for your listening pleasure.

There’s never been any shortage of drama with Fleetwood Mac… long before the soap opera of Rumours, there was the psychodrama of Peter Green (and Jeremy Spencer, and Danny Kirwan…). The saga of how Peter Green– one of the brightest guitarists to come out of ’60’s Britain, right up there with Clapton/Beck/Page– was lost to a drug-fueled spiritual black hole is one of the great “if only…” tales in Rock History. When he passed away in July 2020, I knew it was time to tackle a Green-era Mac classic… I just had to gin up the courage to revisit the nightmare that awaits in “The Green Manalishi (with the Two-Prong Crown)”

“The Green Manalishi (with the Two-Prong Crown)” (Peter Green) Copyright 1970 Palan Music Publishing Ltd.

— This show is one of the many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Check ’em all out!

Rare Earth’s sound was equal parts funky soul and straight-up rock. For decades, when there’s cause for celebration, folks have been crankin’ up this chunk of funk rock. Let’s take a closer look at how Rare Earth carved their place in history with this track.

“I Just Want To Celebrate” (Nick Zesses, Dino Fekaris) Copyright 1971 Jobette Music Co., Inc (BMI)

— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. You should check them out! And don’t forget to subscribe to the show — that way, you’ll never miss an episode, they’ll be delivered right to you.